The Opposite of Murphy’s Law

The life and work of Jóhann Eyfells is a constant reminder that “if something can go right, it will go right.” Since the first day I met with my friend Jóhann, almost nine years ago, my life has taken a whole new meaning, and for the better, without a doubt.

JEyfells2See this teaser, A Force in Nature (password: spirals), a feature length documentary film looking at the life and work of Jóhann Eyfells.

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An insight from Jóhann – Light, Sound and Movement

I recently spoke to the artist, and as usual, I come away inspired. He called to say that he had some hopeful news coming from Iceland that some individuals are taking a keen interest in his work. He seemed optimistic that more and more people are beginning to understand his vision, “almost to a tee.” Personally speaking, in the 8+ years I’ve known Jóhann, I’ve seldom thought of him as being anything other than optimistic.

As always, he asked how I was faring, and how both my children were. He was especially interested in knowing how my own pursuit of a Master’s degree in Motion Picture & Television Directing was getting on. I told him I was inundated with the richness of academia. With regards to A Force in Nature, I told him we were in full post-production and we expect to be close to finishing.

He paused for a moment and then said the following: “Directing is understanding darkness, silence, and stillness.”  At first, I did not get it, but he proceeded to elaborate and said that “light is a consequence of darkness, sound a consequence of silence, and movement a consequence of stillness.” Because light, sound and movement are so fundamental to the making of any movie, I was now re-engaged, thanks to Jóhann, as I reflect on the role I am playing as a director of our film, A Force in Nature. In short, I was re-ignited by a man almost twice my age as I step away from my own effortless tendency towards complacency.

http://vimeo.com/52449621

password: “spirals”

JEyfells

Jóhann Eyfells exhibits at the 1972 Olympics in Munich

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The Art Department of Florida Technological University (FTU, now the University of Central Florida) was the only United States University Art Department chosen to officially participate in the 1972 Olympic Games. Held in Munich, Germany, from August 26 to September 10, 1972, the FTU art faculty led by Walter Gaudnek were commissioned to create giant symbolic sails and sculptural elements on primitive boats, conceived and built by Jóhann Eyfells, as part of a two week art marathon ritual. The works were built and painted in full view of the public and sailed across the Olympic Lake in the Olympic Park.

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The large, floating totems fulfill part of a commission received by Dr. Gaudnek from the Olympic Spielstrasse Committee. In the background is the Olympic soccer, track, and field stadium. FTU was the only American university represented at the Spielstrasse Activities. The Icelandic sculptor, Johann Eyfells, and Steve Lotz, FTU Art Department Chairman, co-created with Gaudnek for the 10 day period of the Spielstrasse activities during the Games.